President Ronald Reagan’s 1986 Immigration Reform legalized the status of some 3 million

Former President Ronald Reagan (AP)

What Happened: In 1986, President Ronald Reagan signed an immigration reform into law that legalized the status of some 3 million people.
Why It Matters: It proves that passing comprehensive immigration legislation is possible.
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National Hispanic Women’s Conference – Phoenix


Three Generations!

September 24-25  2015

Phoenix Convention Center – South Building

http://www.hispanicwomen.org

Red Out Luncheon

Register Now!

602-954-7995

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How to Make Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Source: http://www.tablespoon.com/ – Recipe by Hungry Happenings

How to Make Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Traditional Day of the Dead Sugar Skulls are decorated with a rainbow of colored royal icing.

  • Prep Time 1 hr 30 min
  • Total Time 4 hr 0 min
  • Servings

Celebrate Day of the Dead by decorating your own colorful sugar skulls.

Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) is celebrated in Mexico on November 2nd each year.

People gather to honor their deceased family and friends, and it’s tradition to handcraft brightly colored sugar skulls to place on altars and graves during the festive celebrations. Each skull is made using a mixture of sugar, meringue powder, and water, which is pressed into a skull mold. Then each skull is decorated using colored royal icing, although they can be decorated with beads, feathers, foils, and gems as well (that kind is just for decoration).

This year we’re hosting a Day of the Dead party, so I wanted to make some traditional sugar skulls!

It’s best to make sugar skulls on a nice sunny day or in a temperature and humidity controlled kitchen. If it’s raining or humid outside and you can feel the dampness inside, then your skulls won’t dry out well or hold together. If you do find yourself making them on such a day, you can use your oven to dry the skulls.

Bring it to 150 degrees F then turn it off and wait five minutes. The temperature will begin to fall; you can then put the skulls into the oven with the door cracked open. After 15 minutes, shut the door and allow the skulls to dry completely in the oven.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

The basic ratio of ingredients is 1 cup of sugar to 1 teaspoon meringue powder to 1 teaspoon of water. The Mexican Sugar Skull website claims that meringue powder you buy in craft stores doesn’t work as well as professional grade meringue powder because it’s not as potent. I only had the store-bought kind so I just bumped up the amount a bit and hoped for the best.

I’m happy to report that my skulls dried and hardened perfectly! The amount of ingredients you will need will depend on the size of your skull molds. I used a Wilton 3-D skeleton mold and mixed up 6 cups of sugar with 7 1/2 teaspoons meringue powder and 6 teaspoons of water.

Start by mixing the sugar, meringue powder and water together until all the granules of sugar are wet and feel like wet sand. I found it easiest to mix my ingredients in a food processor. That way the sugar crystals became super fine and will pack into the molds really well.

I poured the sugar and meringue powder in and pulsed it for about 30 seconds before adding the water. I stopped pulsing the mixture when it started looking like wet sand, then scraped the bottom of the bowl then pulsed it again a few seconds. If you don’t have a food processor, you can just mix everything together. Be sure to mix it really well though, so you don’t end up with sugar crystals that aren’t saturated with water.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

To check if your mixture has enough water, grab a handful and squeeze it. If it stays together, you are good. If it falls apart, you need to add more water (a drop at a time) to the sugar, mixing it well.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Begin to fill your skull mold with the wet sugar, pressing down and compacting it as you go.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Fill both the front and back skull cavities with the sugar. Scrape off the excess.

Cut a piece of parchment paper and a piece of cardboard just a bit bigger than your mold. Set the parchment paper down on top of the mold. Set the cardboard on top of the paper. Grab onto the mold and cardboard and carefully flip the whole thing upside down. Set it on the counter, and then carefully lift the mold up off the sugar skulls. The mold should pop right off. It the sugar sticks, it’s too wet. Scrape it out of the mold, clean the mold, and add some more dry sugar to the mixture and try molding it again. If your sugar skulls don’t hold together, the mixture needs more water.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Your sugar skulls now need to dry. Midway through the drying cycle you need to carefully flip them over so the backsides can dry out at well. Small skulls should be dried for about 8-12 hours. Medium skulls will take 12-24 hours. Really large skulls require some of the sugar be scooped out, leaving an inch wall around the outside. To do this, allow the tops of the skulls to dry for 24 hours.

Then turn them upside down and use a spoon to scoop out some of the soft sugar. You can reuse this sugar to make more skulls if you want.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Once your skulls are dried, spread a thin layer of royal icing on the flat part of the backside of each skull.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Press the front and back sides together. Use your finger to wipe off the icing that oozes out from in between the two pieces.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Allow the skulls to dry for at least an hour.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Your skulls are now ready to decorate! To make the royal icing, start by beating together powdered sugar, meringue powder, and water until it’s shiny and will hold stiff peaks. Color small bowls full of royal icing using Betty Crocker gel colors. If you wont be using the icing right away, be sure to cover each bowl with plastic wrap.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

You’ll need to pipe the royal icing onto your skulls. You can use pastry bags fitted with a coupler and pastry tip, or just fitted with a tip. You can also just fill a pastry bag or zip top bag with icing and then snip off the tip of the bag. Pro tip: I had more control over my piping when I added pastry tips to my bags.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Pipe royal icing onto the skulls. Any simple or elaborate designs can be added, including a spider web.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Get as creative as you’d like and use lots of bright colors on each skull for a dramatic appearance.

Colored Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Allow your sugar skulls to dry for several hours before using them.

You’ll love having these beautiful, colorful sugar skulls as decorations for any Day of the Dead event!

See Recipe

How to Make Sugar Skulls (Calavera de Azúcar)

Ingredients

Betty Crocker Gel Food Coloring
1/4 cup meringue powder
6 cups granulated sugar
1/3 cup water
7 1/2 teaspoon meringue powder
6 teaspoons water
1 pound powdered sugar
Royal Icing

Sugar Skulls (makes 4 medium 3-D skulls)

Directions

  • 1 Mix the sugar, meringue powder and water together until all the granules of sugar are wet. Pick up a handful of the mixture and squeeze in your hand. If it holds together, its ready. If it falls apart, it will need a tiny bit more water.
  • 2 Fill your skull mold with the wet sugar, pressing down on the sugar, compacting it as you go.
  • 3 Fill both the front and back skull cavities with the sugar. Scrape off the excess sugar.
  • 4 Cut a piece of parchment paper and a piece of cardboard just a bit bigger than your mold. Set the parchment paper down on top of the mold. Set the cardboard on top of the paper. Grab onto the mold and cardboard, and carefully flip the whole thing upside down. Set it on the counter, then carefully lift the mold up off the sugar skulls. The mold should pop right off. It the sugar sticks, its too wet. Scrape it out of the mold, clean the mold, and add some more dry sugar to the mixture and try molding it again. If your sugar skulls do not hold together, the mixtures needs more water.
  • 5 Your sugar skulls now need to dry. Midway through the drying cycle you need to carefully flip them over so the back sides can dry out at well. They should be ready to decorate in 12-24 hours.
  • 12 Make royal icing. Beat together powdered sugar, meringue powder, and water until its shiny and will hold stiff peaks.
  • 13 Allow the skulls to dry for at least an hour.
  • 13 Press the front and back sides together. Use your finger to wipe off the icing that oozes out from in between the two pieces.
  • 13 Allow your sugar skulls to dry for several hours before using them as decorations for your Day of the Dead event.
  • 13 Pipe royal icing onto the skulls. Any simple or elaborate designs. Get as creative as youd like and use lots of bright colors on each skull for a dramatic appearance.
  • 13 Your skulls are now ready to decorate. Color small bowls full of royal icing using food coloring. If you wont be using the icing right away, be sure to cover each bowl with plastic wrap.
  • 13 Once your skulls are dried, spread a thin layer of royal icing on the flat part of the back side of each skull.

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Cinco de Mayo Recipes and More

Source: http://www.pbs.org/food/

May 5th is Cinco de Mayo, which is often celebrated in America with margaritas and various Mexican dishes. The holiday commemorates the Mexican Army’s victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla. As you pull together your feast, consider these recipes and learn more about the holiday.

Featured Recipes

Strawberry Margaritas for Cinco de Mayo

Strawberry Margaritas

Springtime is a great opportunity to have a Happy Hour drink outside with friends. Follow this easy margarita recipe for a refreshing evening. Continue

Grilled Shrimp Tacos for Cinco de Mayo

Grilled Shrimp Tacos

Add some poblano-corn salsa to these tacos for a festive celebration of flavor especially for an outdoor gathering. Continue

Braised Mushroom Tacos for Cinco de Mayo

Braised Mushroom Tacos

You can make this simple dish which can be prepared in advance to avoid being stuck in the kitchen all night long. Continue

Strawberry Mango Salsa for Cinco de Mayo

Strawberry Mango Salsa

Try this sweet and spicy combination with mango, strawberry, and jalapeno seeds that is great for dipping or over grilled fish. Continue

Cinco de Mayo Recipe Collections

Taco Recipes for Cinco de Mayo

Taco Recipes

What is the best part of having tacos for a meal? You can choose your own fix-ins to include from meat to healthier additions! Continue

Burrito Recipes for Cinco de Mayo

Burrito Recipes

Burritos are a great option for combining your favorite ingredients into one wrap for lunch or dinner. The options are endless. Continue

Salsa Recipes for CInco de Mayo

Salsa Recipes

Have a good bag of chips or pita ready to dip into these salsa recipes. Find your favorite flavor combination. Continue

Margarita Recipes

Margarita Recipes

You cannot forget the most important part of the meal – margaritas! We have scoured the internet for the best margarita recipes. Continue

Kid-Friendly Recipes for Cinco de Mayo

Kid-Friendly Recipes

Our friends at PBS Parents have several recipe suggestions for creating a Cinco de Mayo feast that kids will want to eat too. Continue

Mexican Recipes for Cinco de Mayo

Mexican Recipes

From the traditional to the original, explore our collection of Mexican recipes that you can enjoy throughout the year. Continue

Learn More About Cinco de Mayo

PBS Parents Crafts

Crafts for Kids

Join PBS Parents in some fun crafts your kids can make to celebrate Cinco de Mayo including pinatas and maracas. Continue

Maya and Migel Card Creator

Create Your Own Cinco de Mayo Card

PBS KIDS show Maya and Miguel has an interactive card creator for Cinco de Mayo. Choose your own background and message to send to a friend. Continue

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An early spring visit to Cartagena, South east Spain.

Cartagena, Cityscape, harbours, Mediterranean, spain, street photogrphy, travel photography, western Mediterranean.

Nigel Borrington

Cartagena spain 1
Cartagena, south east Spain
Street and cityscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Spring and late Winter is one of the best time of year to visit Spain, the following images are taken in a the small coastal town of Cartagena , a very friendly and lively little town that has a colourful history including having been of the the key ports for the Roman empire.

“Much of the historical weight of Cartagena in the past goes to its coveted defensive port, one of the most important in the western Mediterranean. Cartagena has been the capital of the Spanish Navy’s Maritime Department of the Mediterranean since the arrival of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century. As far back as the 16th century it was one of the most important naval ports in Spain, together with Ferrol in the North. It is still an important naval seaport, the main military haven…

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Sevilla. The gardens of Casa de Pilatos.

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Plaza de Espana

Source: http://www.travelchannel.com

Spanish - Seville

Photography by Getty Images

Seville, Spain

Matadors, flamenco and Mudejar architecture define Seville, Spain’s quixotic city in Andalucia. At the city’s heart, Maria Luisa Park sprawls for acres to include orange trees, Mediterranean pines, flower gardens, grottoes, a moat and vine-covered cottages. Set within the green space, fanciful Plaza de Espana, an immense semi-circle of connected buildings and archways, draws crowds year-round.  Built in 1929 for a world’s fair, the complex, bedecked with colorful tiles, portrays the history of ancient Spain.

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